Testing for Zika

Testing for Zika

Diagnosis and testing for Zika virus. To diagnose Zika, a doctor or other healthcare provider will ask about any recent travel and any signs and symptoms. A blood or urine test can confirm a Zika infection.

Testing for Zika

See a doctor or other healthcare provider if you develop symptoms of Zika and live in or recently traveled to an area with Zika or had sex without a condom with a person who lives in or traveled to an area with Zika. If you are pregnant, you should see a doctor or other healthcare provider if you develop a fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). You should see a healthcare provider if you live in or recently traveled to an area with Zika or had sex without a condom with a person who lives in or traveled to an area with Zika, even if you do not have symptoms.

The doctor or other healthcare provider may order blood or urine tests to look for Zika or other viruses like dengue or chikungunya. It is important that you make sure to receive your Zika test results even if you are feeling better.

Sexual Transmission and Testing

  • CDC recommends Zika virus testing for people who may have been exposed to Zika through sex if they also have Zika symptoms. Possible exposure to Zika virus from sex includes sex (oral, vaginal, or anal sex or the sharing of sex toys) without a condom with a partner who traveled to or lives in an area with Zika.
  • A pregnant woman with possible exposure to Zika virus from sex should be tested even if she does not have symptoms.
  • A blood or urine test can confirm Zika infection from sexual transmission; however, testing blood, semen, vaginal fluids, or urine is not recommended to determine how likely a person is to pass Zika virus through sex.

If you think you may have or had Zika